INSIGHTS. Magazine

INSIGHTS reports on research at LMU — the latest findings and current debates — online, and in a printed edition that appears twice a year. The latest issue focuses on the topic "Back to life: A post-lockdown generation".

"Releasing Pressure"

Back to life: An interview about a youth in lockdown and what children and young people need now

Back to Life

Tandem actions in the particle world

Hopes are high that quantum theory could yield revolutionary applications. Physicist Jasmin Meinecke is working on the physical foundations of particle systems and studying the central phenomenon of entanglement, which is still a mystery to science.

Tandem actions in the particle world
Prof. Dr. Daniel Gruen

Algorithms to peek into the universe

Astrophysicist Daniel Grün uses artificial intelligence to explore the influence of dark matter and dark energy on the Universe.

Algorithms to peek into the universe

Tracing tangled threads through time

Paleogenomics: When and where did wolves become dogs? LMU geneticist Laurent Frantz uses modern genome sequencing methods to trace the process of animal domestication.

Paleogenomics: Tracing tangled threads through time

Being more comfortable with uncertainty

Political scientist Klaus H. Goetz and sociologist Armin Nassehi discuss how modern societies can deal with fundamental shocks.

Being more comfortable with uncertainty

Living in the face of doom

“The society was constantly in motion": Ancient historian Martin Zimmermann on the spirit of optimism and sense of crisis in the Greek polis

Living in the face of doom

Keeping the memory alive

How to talk about the horror? An interview about the culture of remembrance and the role of first-hand witnesses of the Holocaust.

Keeping the memory alive

Molecular gastronomy

Origin of life: What was the recipe for the "Ursuppe" from which life emerged? LMU chemists Thomas Carell and Oliver Trapp, and physicist Dieter Braun, discuss the early steps in the evolution of life some four billion years ago.

Molecular gastronomy

THE INTERPRETER

Some scientific terms manage to make their way into everyday speech. Here, we ask LMU researchers to tell us what they mean – to define them, and to outline how they became popular.

Modeling the Universe with data

Space and time encoded in 320 million Megabytes: LMU astrophysicist Klaus Dolag uses simulations to study how the cosmos evolved.

Modeling the Universe with data

Molecular tuning: Evolution in fast forward

Biologists led by Dario Leister want to give photosynthesis a helping hand. With the goal of increasing crop yields, they are using algae to accelerate the genetic adaptation of crop plants to changing environmental conditions.

Prof. Dario Leister - a portrait
Portrait von Bärbel Stecher.

The community within us

The most densely populated ecosystem does not belong to the human environment, but to its inner world, says Bärbel Stecher. She studies the microbiome and its complex metabolic network. What makes this community of microorganisms so important for health?

A portrait of Prof. Bärbel Stecher

Deepfakes: “It’s a nightmare of disinformation.”

Modern technology is revolutionizing the ways in which pictures and videos can be faked. The consequences can be serious, warns communication scholar Viorela Dan.

“It’s a nightmare of disinformation”

Conversations with:

Erik Schilling
Peter Schwardmann
Inga Koerte
Fabian Grusdt

In search of the big answers

LMU physicist Fabian Grusdt has received a prestigious ERC Starting Grant. In this portrait, he talks about his career, and his passion for physics.

A portrait of Fabian Grusdt
Edward Snowden poster

Insider knowledge

What makes one a whistleblower? Criminal justice expert Rolf Kölbel discusses their motivations and social roles, and the legal protections that apply to them.

From INSIGHTS on "transparency"
Open plan office

Knowing what the boss knows

Transparency on both sides: How managers and employees in modern companies can share the benefits of work-related data

From INSIGHTS on "transparency"

By the numbers

0.000277778 degrees = 1 arc-second. This number equals the precision with which the uniquely sensitive ring laser ROMY can measure changes in the orientation of the Earth’s axis.

ROMY (Rotational Motions in Seismology)

INSIGHTS. LMU’s Research Magazine: The print edition

INSIGHTS. Two times per year.

Insights shows what makes LMU so renowned: With exciting stories, research features, and interviews, experienced science journalists provide insights into cutting-edge research.

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