1494

Duke Georg the Wealthy of Bavaria-Landshut endows the Georgianum to enable less well-off candidates to study Theology.

On 15 December 1494, Ludwig IX’s son and successor, Duke Georg the Wealthy of Bavaria-Landshut, set up an endowment to finance the establishment of the Georgianum, a foundation for impoverished theology students at the University, which initially provided fellowships for 11 scholars. The Georgianum was only the second Catholic seminary to be set up in Bavaria. As part of Ingolstadt University, it was later relocated to Landshut, and then moved to Munich in 1826. In November 1841 the College took up residence in a new building designed and built by Friedrich von Gärtner on what is now Professor-Huber-Platz. Over 500 years after its foundation, the Georgianum remains an integral part of the University. Joseph Ratzinger – later to become Pope Benedict XVI – and Father Sebastian Kneipp are among its best known alumni.

Contexts

Duke Georg the Rich – founder of the Georgianum

The present-day Georgianum on Professor Huber Platz.

© LMU

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