1848

The King‘s relationship with Lola Montez triggers rioting and leads to the closure of the University.

The background to the closure of the University on 9 February 1848, on the orders of King Ludwig I, must be unique in the annals of higher education. The dancer Lola Montez had been installed as the King‘s mistress since 1846, and exerted a growing influence on government policy. The conflicts between her supporters and opponents in the administration had resulted in ministerial reshuffles and dismissals of LMU professors.In February, disputes broke out at the University between pro-Montez partisans belonging to the student corporation Alemannia (popularly referred to as the Lolamannen because it had assumed the role of Montez’ personal guard) and anti-Montez factions. Ludwig I reacted by first issuing a warning to the University authorities, and then ordering the closure of LMU until the beginning of the Winter Term 1848/49 and the expulsion of all non-resident students from the city for the same period. These measures only exacerbated the protests and incited further unrest. The point at issue now was not just the reopening of the University, but the removal of Lola Montez.On 11 February, the king capitulated, and allowed LMU to open again. But the atmosphere remained tense, and news of the latest revolution in France added a further threatening note. Finally, on 19 March 1848, Ludwig I admitted defeat, and abdicated in favor of his son, Max II.Zum Vergrößern klicken Image: Lola Montez, King Ludwig I’s mistress. Zum Vergrößern klicken Image: Extract from a flyer informing the populace of the King’s decision to close the University Contexts

  1. Historisches Gemälde vo Lola Montez
  2. Handgeschriebener Text auf weißen Papier

Lola Montez, King Ludwig I’s mistress.

Extract from a flyer informing the populace of the King’s decision to close the University