Gender and Diversity as Research Topic

Gender & diversity aspects are research subjects of various disciplines. The study of diversity dimensions contributes to a reflective and informed knowledge production of diversity.

Current research on gender and diversity builds on research areas and programs across numerous disciplines. It encompasses decades of empirical and theoretical work addressing cultural and social origins, gender and sexuality, age, impairment, or discrimination and inequality.

Earth and Environment

The history of the geosciences has largely been interpreted as a history of male scientists, but incorporating their social context into historical research reveals how women have participated in and shaped the history of the geosciences in a variety of roles.

The beginning of geological research in the modern sense occurred in the 1800's. In Germany, the early professionalization of geology and a rigid female gender model effectively excluded women's participation, while in the largely non-professional culture of the natural sciences in the United Kingdom, women were an integral part of the infrastructure of British geology, serving as assistants, secretaries, collectors, painters, and field geologists to the leaders of the geological sciences, complementing and shaping their work.

Problems arose, however, where women aspired to work as independent geologists on their own research programs. These women were also largely denied access to comprehensive geological education through universities, public libraries, or membership in scientific societies, leading to considerable frustration.The increasing professionalization of geology eventually made the female assistants of previous decades obsolete, and when university studies were opened to women in the late 1870s, women geoscientists were perceived as unwelcome competitors. Anti-discrimination laws in the wake of World War I finally forced conservatives in the Geological Society to admit female fellows.

Event details:

Speaker:
PD Dr. Martina Kölbl-Ebert

Time and place
24 June 2022
2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
Luisenstraße 37, Hörsaal C106
Faculty for Geosciences

Anmeldung:
A registration is not required.

Further infomation:
Target group: LMU community and general public
Format: Lecture with discussion
Language: English
Size: max. 190 people
further information

Languages and Cultures

Empathy has played a pivotal role in theatre since the 18th century. Owing to empathy, theatre evolved into an educational institution capable of establishing a new and liberal social order. In (literary) theory and the words of Schiller, it promised to unite “people of all circles, zones, and ranks” into “one singly family”. With the theatrical day-to-day turning out to be much more complex, the question how audiences relate to performances is an intriguing topic. Empathy, in this respect, offers the moral sense to deliver on the promise of a diverse society.

Event Details:

Speakers
Prof. Matthew Reason (York)
Kirsty Sedgman (Bristol)
Ulf Otto (LMU)

Time and place
16.05.2022
6:30 p.m.
Hybrid event

Registration
More Information can be accessed on the CAS website.

Further information:
Target-group: LMU-Community, interested public audience
Format: Panel discussion
Sprache: English
further information

The event will focus on cultural diversity in the Nile Valley (Sudan and Egypt), past and present. It will include three short presentations followed by an interactive discussion. It will begin with an overview of the aims and methods of the ERC project DiverseNile and describe the diversity-sensitive approach of this archaeological project in modern Sudan.The second part of the event will demonstrate how postcolonial approaches to the past help us include actors traditionally excluded from historical narratives about ancient Egypt and Nubia, and discuss the benefits of including such actors in narratives about a more diverse and interesting past.The third part of the session will present case studies from modern pop culture that relate to past Nile cultures. The goal is to show how the study of the reception of ancient Egypt can reveal colonial structures and thus foster a more diverse, cross-cultural research community.

Event Details:

Speakers:
Prof. Dr. Julia Budka
Patrizia Heindl
Rennan Lemos
Faculty of Cultural Studies

Time and place:
23 May 2022
2-4 p.m.
Online via Zoom

Registration:
The event will take place online via Zoom.
To the registration

Additional information:
Target audience: LMU community
Format: Lecture with interactive discussion
Language: English
Size: max. 100 persons

further informationThe event will focus on cultural diversity in the Nile Valley (Sudan and Egypt), past and present. It will include three short presentations followed by an interactive discussion. It will begin with an overview of the aims and methods of the ERC project DiverseNile and describe the diversity-sensitive approach of this archaeological project in modern Sudan.The second part of the event will demonstrate how postcolonial approaches to the past help us include actors traditionally excluded from historical narratives about ancient Egypt and Nubia, and discuss the benefits of including such actors in narratives about a more diverse and interesting past.The third part of the session will present case studies from modern pop culture that relate to past Nile cultures. The goal is to show how the study of the reception of ancient Egypt can reveal colonial structures and thus foster a more diverse, cross-cultural research community.Event Details:

Speakers:
Prof. Dr. Julia Budka
Patrizia Heindl
Rennan Lemos
Faculty of Cultural Studies

Time and place:
23 May 2022
2-4 p.m.
Online via Zoom

Registration:
The event will take place online via Zoom.
To the registration

Additional information:
Target audience: LMU community
Format: Lecture with interactive discussion
Language: English
Size: max. 100 persons

Further information

The event deals with the topic of "Linguistic and Cultural Diversity" from various perspectives and provides insights into research projects based at the Institute for German as a Foreign Language and the International Research Center for Multilingualism. Topics such as migration and integration of refugees, language acquisition and language forgetting in the migration situation and the mutual influence of languages will be examined as well as language biographies of multilingual speakers and writing in several languages. Furthermore, examples from the projects will show how migrants deal with linguistic and cultural diversity in everyday life and how this contributes to their identity formation.

The event will be rounded off by a panel discussion with representatives from science, business and politics on the topic of "Linguistic and cultural diversity as an engine for social change".

Event details:

Speakers:
Prof. Dr. Claudia M. Riehl
Dr. Anne Harr
Dr. Nikolas Koch
Johanna Holzer
Faculty of Linguistics and Literature

Time and Place:

June 2, 2022
5-7:30 p.m.
Main Building, Lichthof,
Kleine Aula, Raum A U115 and A U121

Registration:
Registration is required via E-Mail.

Further information:

Target group: LMU-Community and general public
Format: Lecture, panel discussion, practical examples, exhibition
Language: German/English
Size: max. 150 people
further information

The approximately 7,000 languages of our planet differ considerably in their grammatical structures. Despite this undeniable diversity, linguistics has also long been driven by the goal of describing common features of all languages (so-called universals). Added to this is the effort to do justice not only to global linguistic diversity, but also to the rich variation within languages, i.e., dialects, accents, group languages, and so on. In this respect, English is one of the best researched languages in the world.In the last 20 years, the development of electronic resources has helped to shed more light on both issues using large amounts of linguistically and sociologically processed data.In our interactive event we want to give visitors insights into the study of linguistic diversity, especially in relation to English, and offer them the opportunity to explore diversity and universality in the world's languages on the one hand, and in the world language English on the other, with the help of various databases, corpora and electronic tools.In addition, we will use recent theories to show how certain language contact scenarios can lead not only to the extinction or displacement of certain (smaller) languages, but how social diversity and multilingualism in particular give rise to the emergence of new varieties and languages, and thus of cultural spaces.

Event details:

Speakers:
Prof. Dr. Stephanie Hackert
Prof. Dr. Ursula Lenker
Prof. Dr. Hans-Jörg Schmid
Elisabeth Huber
Melanie Keller
Catherine Laliberté
Diana Wengler
Quirin Würschinger
Carolin Harthan
PD Dr. Christine Elsweiler
Fakultät für Sprach- und Literaturwissenschaften

Time and place:

June 23, 2022
2-4 p.m.
Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, Kleine Aula

Registration for live attendance:
Please register by June 20, 2022 at the latest if you would like to attend the event in attendance. The number of participants is limited.
To the registration form

Registration for Zoom participation
Should you wish to watch the event via stream, you can register until June 21, 2022. Link will follow.

Further information:
Target group: LMU community
Format: Lectures with practical examples
Event type: Presence/Livestream (hybrid)
Language: German/English
Size: max. 120 persons

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